Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Ultrasonic Flow Measurement Overview

clamp on ultrasonic flowmeter llow meter
Clamp-on ultrasonic flow meter does not contact
process media
Courtesy Micronics
Ultrasonic flow meters measure, via sound waves inaudible to humans, the velocity of fluid flowing through a conduit. The conduit can be a recognizable closed piping run, or open channels, flumes, or chutes. The technology is predominantly applied to liquids and gases.

There are three types of ultrasonic flow meters, differentiated by their means of measurement. An open channel flow meter derives liquid depth by computing geometrical distance, combining it with a velocity measurement and known dimensional properties of a flume or other channel. A Doppler shift flow meter reflects ultrasonic energy off sonically reflective materials and measures the frequency shift between emission and reflection to derive a fluid velocity measurement. The contrapropogating transit-time flow meter, more recognizably, the transmission flow meter. The transmission flow meter has two versions: the in-line and the clamp-on. The in-line configuration is intrusive, with flow meter hardware extending into and exposed to the measured media. A clamp-on style ultrasonic flow meter resides on the outside of the pipe, emitting and receiving the ultrasonic pulses through the pipe wall. These process measurement tools, using ultrasound technology, have the ability to measure fluid velocity and calculate volumetric, mass, and totalized flow. The use of ultrasonic flow measurement is prevalent in the oil and gas, nuclear, wastewater, pharmaceutical, and food and beverage industries. It is also employed in energy management systems as a means to measure energy demand.

For intrusive flow meters, sensors are fitted opposite one another and alternate bouncing ultrasonic signals back and forth in the pipe, in an almost tennis-like format. In an elementary explanation, by increasing the number of sensors, engineers are able to decipher flow proportions through calculations of velocity between sensory transmissions; thereby, the flow volume can be computed.

For externally mounted flow meters, a clamp-on device affixes the flow meter measurement elements to the pipe. One special characteristic of clamp-on flow meters is the ability to transmit ultrasonic signals through piping up to four meters in diameter, making them suitable for application in very large systems such as those found in hydroelectric or wastewater installations. The clamp-on arrangement also facilitates addition of a flow measurement point to an existing system without process interruption.

The technology is pervasive in the processing industries, having its particular niche of applications where it excels. Proper installation is a key element in producing reliable and consistent results. Ultrasonic energy flow technology is used for custody transfer of natural gases and petroleum liquids. Custody transfer usually entails following industry, national, and government standards and regulations. Other popular applications include compressed air system monitoring and energy usage metering.

Ultrasonic flow meters, with no moving parts, are comparatively low maintenance and self-diagnosing. Temperature and pressure measurements are needed to calculate mass flow of gases. When measuring liquid mass flow in pipes, it is generally necessary for the pipe cross section to be media filled in order to obtain reliable results.

Whatever your flow measurement challenge, share it with a process measurement specialist. Combine your process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Hile Controls of Alabama - Video

We made this short video to illustrate the markets and industries we serve. Please check it out and be sure and contact Hile Alabama and share your process control, instrumentation, and automation challenges with experts. Let's combine your process knowledge and experience with our product application expertise to formulate and effective solution.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Appropriate Application for Pressure Regulator Valve and Back Pressure Regulator

pilot operated sliding gate pressure regulator
Pilot Operated Sliding Gate
Pressure Regulator
Courtesy Jordan Valve
Fluids move throughout processes, driven by pressure produced with mechanical or naturally occurring means. In many cases the pressure generated by the driving source is substantially greater than what may be desired at particular process steps. In other cases, the operation may dictate that a minimum pressure be maintained within a portion of the process train. Both cases are handled by the appropriate valve type, designed specifically to regulate pressure.

A pressure regulating valve is a normally open valve that employs mechanical means, positioning itself to maintain the outlet pressure set on the valve. Generally, this type of valve has a spring that provides a countervailing force to the inlet pressure on the valve mechanism. An adjustment bolt regulates the force produced by the spring upon the mechanism, creating an equilibrium point that provides flow through the valve needed to produce the set outlet pressure. A typical application for a pressure regulator is to reduce upstream or inlet pressure to a level appropriate for downstream processing equipment.

self operated pressure regulator valve
Self-operated Pressure Regulator
Courtesy Jordan Valve

Back pressure valves are normally closed, operating in a logically reversed fashion to pressure regulators. Where pressure regulators control outlet pressure, a back pressure valve is intended to maintain inlet pressure. Similar internals are present in the back pressure valve, with the valve action reversed when compared to a pressure regulator. An inlet pressure reduction in the back pressure valve will cause the valve to begin closing, restricting flow and increasing the inlet pressure. A representative application for a back pressure valve is a multi-port spray station. The back pressure valve will work to maintain a constant setpoint pressure to all the spray nozzles, regardless of how many may be open at a particular time.

Both of these valve types are available in an extensive array of sizes, capacities, pressure ranges, and materials of construction to accommodate every process requirement. Share your fluid control challenges with a process control specialist. Combining your process knowledge with their product application expertise will produce effective solutions.